CPA’s 2021 National Annual Convention


The CPA has continued to monitor the ongoing issues related to the COVID-19 situation in Canada and abroad, inclusive of federal and provincial government decisions taken in the service of community safety.  Experts and all levels of government continue to warn or advise about the greater transmission risks posed by large gatherings of people.

While we do not know for how long COVID-19 will remain a public health emergency in Canada, we do know that at this time, restrictions continue to exist regarding in-person gatherings of more than 50 attendees, where proper physical distancing measures would be difficult to implement and maintain.  Accordingly, the CPA has taken the decision to cancel our in-person 82nd CPA Annual National Convention in Ottawa, ON, scheduled for June 4-6, 2021, inclusive of all pre-convention workshops that would occur on June 3rd and pivot, once again, to a virtual event over the month of June.

We have made this decision based on the guidance and directives of experts and governments, and out of concern for the safety and well-being of our members and affiliates, attendees, staff, public and the various teams that support the annual convention. With the benefit of time to plan, we are excited and confident in our ability to plan a fabulous virtual event.

In accordance with our by-laws, the CPA will convene its Annual General Meeting (AGM) virtually in June; more details will follow in the months ahead.

We will open the abstract submission system for the CPA2021 Convention by the end of October.  We hope that you will consider submitting to and participating in our virtual event; it will feature familiar presentation types as well as some new formats that align with a virtual offering.

We appreciate your understanding and flexibility as we remain responsive to the ongoing situation that COVID-19 presents, while continuing to serve our members and affiliates, and the broader community of psychological scientists, practitioners and/or educators.

We recognize and appreciate that you are likely experiencing upheaval and disruption in your daily life, both personally and professionally. We continue to wish you strength and patience, both personally and professionally, as you cope with the ongoing pandemic and look forward to “seeing” you at our virtual event.

If you have any questions or want further information, please contact the CPA at convention@cpa.ca.

Take good care and be well.
CPA Convention Department

Spotlight: Mentorship Program creator Zarina Giannone

Zarina in the House of Commons

“A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity. An optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.”
– unknown

Zarina Giannone lives by the principle of creating, grasping, and making the most of every opportunity she can. When I spoke with her, we attributed this quote to Winston Churchill – almost everyone does. On further investigation, however, there is no evidence that Churchill ever said this. The earliest known utterance of a similar sentiment was by the Mayor of Carlisle, Bertram Carr, in 1919, as he addressed the Fifty-First Annual Cooperative Congress in the middle of a global pandemic.

The provenance of the quote is, of course, immaterial. It is quite likely that this was a saying that circulated England for many years before being transcribed from Bertram’s speech. I just happen to be the person who has the time to look up such things as the provenance of quotes. Zarina Giannone is not that person – she is too busy seizing real opportunities.

One of those opportunities was her election to the CPA Board of Directors as the Student Representative. Zarina had been a student rep, and from there took on role after role until finally making this step in the first year of her Master’s. She says of her three year term on the CPA Board,

“Seriously, it goes down in the books as the most important part of my training to date. Even counting my seven years of graduate school, the experience [of sitting on the Board] was the most valuable to me. Because of the people I met and learned from, but also just to see the system, how it works across the country. After my term ended on the board, I was elected to the BC Psychological Association Board, where I’ve just now come to the end of my three-year term. I’m now a senior student, and with the experience I had with the CPA Board, I have a lot more to contribute.”

There are many important parts of Zarina’s training, not all of them academic. For many years, she was an elite-level soccer player, going to UBC on an athletic scholarship and playing for the Thunderbirds for the duration of that scholarship. In fact, she focused so much on soccer at that time that she neglected her studies a little bit – it was her boyfriend at the time (now fiancé – more on that later) who encouraged her to dive more heavily into her studies, and her love for the field of psychology took off from there.

Zarina’s experiences as a high-performance athlete come in to play all the time for her now, as she works with sports teams as a mental performance consultant. In her job at the Vancouver Psychology Centre, she provides two different services, broadly speaking. One is performance related – how do you achieve peak performance, how do you get around barriers like choking or performance anxiety. The other is on the clinical side, where she deals with clinical psychological issues in sports. These might be anxiety-related, depressive symptoms, trauma-related challenges, disordered eating, and that kind of thing.

All these things – soccer, scholarships, the CPA Student Rep Program, the Student Section, the Boards, the job at Vancouver Psychology Centre, are opportunities Zarina has seized when they presented themselves. But she is also, by nature, a creator of opportunity as well. In 2015, she was learning about the systems-level approach to education and psychology from her position on the CPA Board of Directors, and also representing students on the section level as the Chair of the Student Executive.

TAKE FIVE WITH ZARINA GIANNONE

What is the psychological concept (bystander apathy, confirmation bias, that sort of thing) that blew you away when you first heard it?
There are so many… psychology is so rich with little tidbits that are mind-boggling, and I’m always impressed with something new. One specific thing might be attribution error. It’s peoples’ tendency to underemphasize situational factors when explaining other peoples’ behaviour, and to over-emphasize personality-based factors or dispositional factors to explain behaviour. The more I work with clients, the more I see that error happening. People attribute the behaviour of other people to being a bad person, or a mean person, versus something that was happening for or to that person in their own context.

Do you have a sport that you like to watch or play, and what is it?
I got into soccer very early, before I was 5. I played with an older age group, went into the provincial program and then into the youth National program. I got recruited to UBC on scholarship in Grade 12, and played out my scholarship at UBC. I also got a chance to play one season at Cardiff University in the UK. After I came back, I took up boxing and suffered a back strain, and so that changed things a lot – I play just for fun at this point, I like the co-ed leagues where I can push the guys around. Soccer still holds a huge place in my heart, and I love watching international tournaments whenever they happen. Go Italia!

You can listen to only one musical artist/group for the rest of your life. Who is it?
This one’s a bit embarrassing… one of my favourites is Sean Paul. He was really big when I was back in high school. I don’t care where I am, when I hear a Sean Paul song it puts me in a good mood and takes me back. If I could have anyone perform at my wedding, it would be Sean Paul.

If you could spend a day in someone else’s shoes who would it be and why
One of my role models, and a person that’s so interesting to me, is Michael Jordan. I’ve always been a huge fan, and I think he is a textbook case study of drive and competitiveness, and obviously his track record of being the best player of all time. I’d love to spend a day in his brain to see how he does it. And I think if we could take a little of that and spread it throughout sports, then sports might change a lot.

If you could become an expert at something outside psychology, what would it be?
I attribute this to my experiences being on the boards I’ve served on. I think it’s in politics. We want so badly to effect change within our field of psychology and we do – at the individual, group, and sometimes organizational level. But to be able to have that kind of impact on a systems level, on a larger scale, I would love to be able to effect change in that way. To really represent and advocate and be involved in changes that I see as important.

She noted issues and challenges that she had experienced as a student – having to be really resourceful throughout the various steps of her training, and not having enough information available and accessible to her. Out of this need, the Student Mentorship Program was born. Zarina realized that connecting students with one another across the country could alleviate some of these stresses for students just starting out, by pairing them with older students who had gone through the same process and could direct them in constructive ways.

Mentors are graduate-level students, while mentees are undergrads or early graduate level students. Most psychology students, by virtue of the fact that they are taking similar courses in similar subjects and following similar career paths, have a lot in common. They share a career passion and a course load, for example. But Zarina thought there could be more to the mentor-mentee relationship than simply subject matter.

When students signed up to be on either side of this partnership, they would fill out forms. What area are you hoping to go into? What are some of your interests? What would you like to get out of the mentoring relationship? Once those questions had been answered, Zarina and her colleagues from the Student Section Executive would match mentors and mentees based on shared goals, interests, and other commonalities. Kind of like a matchmaking service, in a non-romantic sense. And one that proved to be a little bit COVID-proof, since students were connecting virtually with mentors from universities all across Canada for the program.

Not all things, however, are COVID-proof, and not all things are non-romantic. Though Zarina says she hasn’t had too many problems with school, or work, since the pandemic began, one big thing remains undone. Remember that boyfriend, now fiancé, who encouraged her to get more into psychology? She was scheduled to marry him in Mexico, in November.

Even the most prepared among us, those accustomed to turning every difficulty into an opportunity, are sometimes confronted by a disappointment beyond our control. It is in this case that Zarina sees that one opportunity that exists in all circumstances – the opportunity to learn something.

“We’re going to postpone it, and hopefully have it in November of next year. Or…whenever it’s possible. We’ll figure it out, we’ll work through it, we’ll learn. I think it’s such a privilege that our whole lives we can be learning. I’m always reminded of the things I don’t know. On his death bed Michelangelo was in the middle of painting a fresco, and he told someone near him ‘ancora imparo’. ‘I’m still learning’. That’s kind of my attitude too.”

Zarina is far from the end of her days, as she is just starting her career in psychology, has just finished her PhD, and is about to start life as a married person. That leaves a lot of life, and a lot of learning, to do. And Zarina is on her way to experiencing it all.

Postscript: Michelangelo really did say ‘ancora imparo’ on his death bed, that quote checks out.

CPA/CSBBCS Virtual Career Fair

The Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), in collaboration with the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science (CSBBCS), is pleased to announce that it will be hosting a Career Fair on November 12th, 2020.  This Fair will mark the first in a series of Career Fairs the CPA will host in 2020 and 2021.

When: Thursday November 12th, 2020 from 12pm – 4pm EST
Where: Virtual
Limited spaces available.
Cost: $10.00

Click here for more information


CPA’s 2020 Student Research Grants: Rules and Eligibility Criteria

CANADIAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION STUDENT RESEARCH GRANTS : RULES AND ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA

The Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) wishes to support student research in all areas of psychology.

Funding up to $1,500.00 is available per project.  For 2020, a maximum of 10 awards will be dispersed.  Deadline for applications is Friday November 27, 2020 at 4pm EST.

At the time of application and if successful, over the term of the grant, the applicant/grantee must be a graduate student affiliate in good standing of the CPA; enrolled full-time in a psychology graduate program at a provincially or territorially chartered Canadian University. The applicant’s/grantee’s direct supervisor must also be a member in good standing of the CPA.

Students can only be funded once from this funding opportunity.

The adjudication committee will consider the following in evaluating proposals:

  1. Applicant’s Qualifications
    • Scholarships & Awards
    • Publications
    • Conference Presentations & Other Relevant Experience
  2. Merits of Proposal
    • Rationale & Background
    • Feasibility, Design & Methods
    • Potential Impact & Originality

NEW THIS YEAR!

CPA logoCSBBCS logo

One additional award valued at $1,500.00 will be given out to a proposal specific to the Brain and Cognitive Sciences; this award is financially co-sponsored by Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour and Cognitive Science (CSBBCS).  To apply for this award, a student applicant/grantee and their supervisor must be an affiliate/member in good standing, at the time of application and over the term of the grant (if successful), of either the CPA or the CSBBCS.

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

Applications must be submitted electronically via this link: https://cpa.ca/machform/view.php?id=15577

Applications can be submitted in English or in French.

Application requirements include:

  1. An abstract of 250 words or less summarizing the research.
  2. A description (maximum 5 double-spaced pages including references, figures) outlining:
    1. the rationale and background, feasibility, design and methods, potential impact, and originality
  3. Status/proof of REB review process
  4. Specific amount requested, including an itemized budget.
  5. CV of applying student.
  6. A statement from the student’s department chair that the department supports the student’s application and will comply with the CPA’s rules for funds administration if the student’s application is successful. The letter must note that expenditures will only be authorized once REB approval or registration is obtained.  The appropriate University administrator’s name, email address, postal address, title and business phone number should be indicated.

Applications not meeting all of the proposal requirements will not be considered for funding.

RELEASE OF FUNDS

For funded projects, the CPA will release funds upon receiving a valid certificate of compliance from the Research Ethics Board (REB) of the applicant’s institution along with confirmation of affiliate status from the CPA’s Membership Department (or the CSBBCS’s Membership Department in the case of the CPA-CSBBCS Joint Award).

RESPONSIBILITIES OF GRANT RECIPIENTS

Successful applicants will be expected to provide a final (or progress) report to the CPA’s Scientific Affairs Committee (science@cpa.ca) of the outcome of their research (approximately 500 words) within 18-months of receiving funding. Successful applicants will also be expected to submit a 150-word write up of their research for Psynopsis, the CPA’s quarterly magazine. The CPA should be acknowledged in any publications or presentations resulting from the research.  Unused funds after the defense of the thesis must be returned to the CPA.

GENERAL RULES

  • At the time of application and if successful, over the term of the grant, the applicant/grantee must be a graduate student affiliate in good standing of the CPA (or the CSBBCS in the case of the CPA-CSBBCS Joint Award); enrolled full time in a psychology graduate program at provincially or territorially chartered Canadian University.
  • At the time of application and over the term of the grant (if successful), the applicant’s/grantee’s direct supervisor must also be a member in good standing of the CPA (or the CSBBCS in the case of the CPA-CSBBCS Joint Award)
  • Proposals with co-applicants will not be accepted/considered.
  • Grants are awarded to eligible student researchers and are administered through the institution’s administration systems. The student grantee authorizes expenditures in accordance with the CPA’s policies and requirements, as outlined here, and with institution policies. No one may initiate or authorize expenditures from the CPA grant account without the student grantee’s delegated authority.
  • Grant funds must contribute towards the direct costs of the research for which the funds were awarded, and the benefits should be directly attributable to the grant. The institution pays for the indirect or overhead costs associated with managing the research funded by CPA.
  • Expenditures will only be authorized once Research Ethics Board (REB) approval is obtained.
  • Each institution establishes appropriate procedures, systems and controls to ensure that the CPA’s requirements are followed. The institution has the right and responsibility to withhold and withdraw approval of expenditures proposed by a student grantee that contravene the CPA’s requirements or the institution’s policies and, when appropriate, to seek advice or ruling from the CPA as to eligibility of expenses.
  • The CPA follows the Canadian tax regulation for reporting and as such, will be required to issue a T4A. Please contact the CPA’s Executive Assistant, Kimberley Black via telephone: Local: 613-237-2144, ext. 323; Toll-free : 1-888-472-0657 ext. 323, to provide your Social Insurance Number.

ELIGIBLE EXPENSES

  • Research personnel (e.g., research assistant)
  • Consulting fees (e.g., programmer, statistician)
  • Fees paid for the purpose of participant recruitment, such as modest incentives to consider participation (i.e., to establish a potential participant pool), where approved by a Research Ethics Board
  • Fees paid to research participants, such as modest incentives for participation, where approved by a Research Ethics Board
  • Materials

NON-ELIGIBLE EXPENSES

  • Costs of alcohol
  • Costs of entertainment, hospitality and gifts
  • Travel/registration/accommodation costs related to attending a conference
  • Costs related to staff awards and recognition
  • Education-related costs such as thesis preparation, tuition and course fees, leading up to a degree
  • Costs involved in the preparation of teaching materials
  • Costs of basic services such as heat, light, water, compressed air, distilled water, vacuums and janitorial services supplied to all laboratories in a research facility
  • Insurance costs for buildings or equipment
  • Costs associated with regulatory compliance, including ethical review, biohazard, or provincial or municipal regulations and by-laws
  • Monthly parking fees for vehicles, unless specifically required for field work
  • Sales taxes to which an exemption or rebate applies
  • Costs of regular clothing
  • Patenting expenses
  • Costs of moving a lab

APPLICATION FORM

You cans submit your application here: https://cpa.ca/machform/view.php?id=15577

The CPA’s response to the federal government’s speech from the throne

The CPA applauds the government for recognizing the need to invest in the mental health of the people of Canada in today’s Speech from The Throne. The pandemic, and in particular the necessary way in which we must manage the pandemic, is taking a big toll on our mental health and resilience. The wealth of any country depends in large measure on the mental health and well-being of the people and citizens it serves. While commitment to publicly-funded health care is a core value of this country, Canada has not funded mental health care in parity with physical health care. That must change. Canada needs a health care system that delivers the care people need, where, when and from whom they need it – and includes the evidence-based services of licensed health providers like psychologists, who are trained and licensed to deliver that care. The CPA looks forward to working with the federal government to protect and advance our collective mental health.


Written Submission for the Pre-Budget Consultations in Advance of the 2021 Budget by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA)

Written Submission for the Pre-Budget Consultations in Advance of the 2021 Budget by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA)

Read the submission (PDF). (version francais ici).

See also the submissions from The Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health (CAMIMH) and The Canadian Consortium for Research (CCR)


Psychology works for COVID-19. Psychologists giving back to front line service providers.

COVID-19 Front Line Workers

COVID-19 is having a significant impact on the mental health of Canadians, none more so than those who are working on the front lines of health care. Canadians with COVID-19 depend on the expertise of health care providers. The health and well-being of those providers are critical to them being able to deliver this expertise. Hundreds of registered psychologists have signed on to an initiative of the CPA to provide psychological services, via tele-health, to health care providers working at the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis. Click here to read more about this initiative and to find a psychologist in your area who has volunteered to provide psychological services at no charge.

If you are a psychologist registered to practice in Canada and would like to donate some of your time to provide psychological services to front line health care providers who may be feeling stressed, overwhelmed or distressed by being on the front lines of this COVID-related health crisis, please click here to register: https://web2.cpa.ca/membersurveys/index.php/451688?lang=en.

Frequently Asked Questions

Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC)

The MHCC is here for you

Resource hub dedicated to mental health and wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic

Dear friends:

Given the ever-changing events around the COVID-19 pandemic, we are all experiencing varying degrees of a normal reaction to an abnormal event. 
 

ACCESS OUR NEW RESOURCE HUB HERE

As you know, the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) isn’t a mental health services provider. Regrettably, we cannot respond to requests from individuals or clinicians. But during this time, what we can offer you is curated, evidence-based information you can trust.

In times of high anxiety and stress, it’s more important than ever to safeguard your mental wellness. That includes stemming the tide of non-essential information and paring down your news consumption. It also includes accessing reliable sources of information.

Our commitment is to share credible information and resources related to mental wellness during the COVID-19 pandemic on a dedicated resource hub. It will provide you with tools we have created, links to credible national and international resources and share the proactive measures we are taking to promote mental health as we work together to plank the curve.

While our country has collectively mobilized to practice physical distancing, the strength of our social connections is more important than ever.

We’ll get through this by supporting each other in the spirit of solidary that you’ve always found on our social media channels, and which now extends to this new resource hub. 

Keep safe and let’s stay connected.

Sincerely, 

Louise Bradley, C.M.
President and CEO

CPA/CPAP: COVID-19 Telepsychology & Business Interruption Insurance

Canadian Psychological Association / Council of Professional Associations of Psychologists co-hosted webinar on the current state of COVID-19 Telepsychology & Business Interruption Insurance. Dr. Karen Cohen of the CPA and Dr. Judi Malone of CPAP moderate this presentation by BMS and Gowling.

https://youtu.be/RtG63Jx717E

COVID-19 Member Message

As the impact of COVID-19 is being felt worldwide, we recognize the pressure this evolving crisis is placing on educators, teachers, supervisors and practitioners of psychology throughout Canada. On behalf of the CPA, we extend our gratitude for the leadership roles so many of you are playing in your communities and your efforts to address the needs of your colleagues, students and patients.

To support your efforts, and to inform the public, we have compiled and created a variety of resources.  We and are also working with our partners and other associations to advocate for, not only on behalf of our members, but also for members of the Canadian public.

  • FACT SHEETS. Thanks to Dr. Steven Taylor, we have prepared a new Psychology Works COVID-19 fact sheet, and created a page on our the CPA website for all important updates related to the virus – https://cpa.ca/corona-virus/. Many thanks as well to CPA’s Health Psychology Section for their contributions. Both the fact sheet and web page continue to evolve as we receive new information. We suggest regularly checking in with our CPA website as it will continue to be updated as the situation evolves, and new information is shared.
  • In addition to the fact sheet on coping with COVID-19, already posted at the link above, three more are in the works – one on working at home with children, the psychological impacts of COVID-19, and resources related to telepsychology. We hope to have these posted imminently at https://cpa.ca/corona-virus/
  • In addition, BMS and Gowling WLG have prepared an article on telepsychology practice which we will post imminently at https://cpa.ca/corona-virus/. Next week, BMS and Gowling WLG will also deliver a webinar to psychologists on the impact of COVID-19 on psychological practice. Any policy holder – member of CPA or a member of a provincial and territorial association – who has a question they would like BMS and Gowlings to address in the webinar, please email executiveoffice@cpa.ca by Monday, March 23, 2020.  Details about the date and time of the webinar, and how to join it, will be sent to the membership, and posted at https://cpa.ca/corona-virus/, as soon as the details are confirmed. 
  • PRACTICE MANAGEMENT. The membership has long known that CPA has been developing a Practice Management Platform partnership to enable our members to communicate securely with their patients, deliver tele-psychology services and maintain electronic health records.  The agreements to support this partnership are nearly complete and, in light of COVID-19 and the need for psychology providers to find other than in-person means of delivering services, CPA’s leadership is doing all it can to expedite the launch of the partnership.
  • ACCREDITATION. CPA’s Accreditation Panel has been working with its partners at APA, ASPPB, CCPPP and ACPRO to address the impact that COVID-19 will have on training experiences and program completion of students and interns.  CPA’s Accreditation Panel will soon issue a statement on this topic.
  • CONVENTION 2020. We know that many of you are wondering about the status of our 2020 CPA Convention in Montreal. A decision about proceeding or cancelling the convention should be made shortly.  We ask for your understanding as this decision will be taken with the safety of delegates and staff considered first and foremost.  We will update our membership as soon as a decision is taken. 
  • ORGANIZATIONS FOR HEALTH ACTION. CPA sits on the Management Committee of Organizations for Health Action (HEAL) who have collectively written to the Federal Minister of Health offering our collective voice and assistance. HEAL represents 650,000 of Canada’s health care providers.  We will shortly be undertaking a survey of our member organizations to ensure that the experiences of health practitioners and researchers are shared with government and decision-makers.  CPA would really like to hear from you – if you have issues, concerns, suggestions about COVID-19 and the science, practice or education of psychology, please let us know at executiveoffice@cpa.ca; please put COVID-19 in the subject line.  We will share the results of the survey of health provider associations as soon as these are available. 
  • CPA STAFF. Here at our Head Office, we are working alongside many Canadians to flatten the curve of COVID-19 transmission by working from home. We continue to do the same work we normally do, with tele-work protocols in place.
  • MEDIA. In addition, we are reaching out to the media to help accentuate the unique expertise psychologists bring to the current crisis. Many of our members have been interviewed in dozens of media outlets across the country and around the world including the Globe and Mail, CTV, CBC, Global News and the National Post. 

We can see the medical and physical impact COVID-19 is having around the world, but the full extent of the psychological impact is not yet known. Our discipline and profession have much to contribute. 

Thank you all for your leadership and your guidance. Stay safe and stay healthy. Any questions or concerns, please contact executiveoffice@cpa.ca

Dr. Ian R. Nicholson, C.Psych.
President 2019/20

K.R. Cohen Ph.D., C. Psych.
Chief Executive Officer

Canadian research funding organizations sign San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA)

Canada’s five major national research funders are pleased to join research leaders around the world who are working to strengthen research excellence by ensuring robust, equitable and impactful measures of research assessment. The Government of Canada’s research funding agencies — CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC, CFI, and Genome Canada—have signed the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), reaffirming their commitment to excellence in research evaluation and the importance of knowledge translation. https://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/Media-Media/ProgramNewsDetails-NouvellesDesProgrammesDetails_eng.asp?ID=1103

DORA is a global initiative to support the development and promotion of best practice in assessment of scholarly research. It aims to address the negative consequences of unintended overuse of journal publication as a primary indicator of quality for research output. https://sfdora.org/